Fire at water treatment plant- smoke seen for miles

Lt. 79 Nate Coia works on setting up the main on Ladder 79

The fire company was dispatched to the ChalBrit water treatment plant on Lower State Road in Doylestown Township on May 24, 2017. Engines 19, 79, Ladder 79, Rescue 19 and fire police responded. Chief 19 Sam Cramer, Jr. was in charge of operations at his former place of employment for over 20 years. There were no injuries, but alot of fire gear needed to be washed afterwards.

Jess Meisinger heads to the fire after helping set up the ladder for service.
The fire was seated in the roof of the processing building.
Chief 19 Sam Cramer, Jr. ran operations, here with Chalfont Battalion chief Nick Marino.
Dan Kline and Jess Meisinger on a line on side A.
Chief 19 Sam Cramer, Jr. and Deputy 19 Ed Truman.
Firefighter Pete Mills on the pump panel of Ladder 79.

 

Small house fire creates concerns, challenges

Engine 19’s crew of Tommy Kirk, Nick Tartaglia and Evan Birmingham enter with the first line.

Box 79-41 was dispatched at 5:41 PM on May 22, 2017 for a dwelling fire at 37 Quarry Road in Doylestown Township. En route to the scene, Captain 79 Craig Lager and Chief 19 Sam Cramer, Jr. were informed by Bucks County Fire Radio that police were on scene and reporting heavy smoke from the dwelling. On arrival, a working fire was transmitted, with the possibility of 1 occupant trapped but not located. Initially companies were in service searching for a victim,  but after 20 minutes, the occupant walked up to the fireground, unhurt. Fire was knocked down quickly, but due to interior conditions overhaul was extensive and slow. There were no injuries. Thanks to all the companies who responded or covered, including Warrington, Hartsville, Chalfont, Plumsteadville, Midway, Warwick, Warminster Fire and Horsham covering Station 29. Also thanks to Warrington Community and Central Bucks Ambulance for rehab services on scene, and Doylestown Township and Central Bucks Regional Police Departments. The fire was placed under control at 6:11 PM, and companies cleared the scene at 8:22 PM.

Stretching the first line are Capt. 79 Craig Lager and FF Michele Cevasco.
Warrington firefighters arrive to assist.
More troops arrive to assist.
Conditions in the rear, along with limited space, made access difficult. Firefighters Jess Meisinger and Grant Castor access from side C.
Firefighter Kyle Downs works on ventilation at the front of the building.
Operations acting chief Mike Wood directs firefighters.
The dwelling was next to the Edison Quarry.
Fresh troops wait to be given orders.
Don’t let the gear fool you, that’s Lt. 79 Nate Coia, borrowing some gear.
The rehab sector, with Medic 129 personnel taking care of firefighters.

Unbelieveable find in a burning pile of trash

Found in the trash- a still hot piece of discarded firewood.

On the cold, sunny morning of March 17, 2017, the fire company was dispatched for a trash truck fire in Buckingham Township at Coldbrook Ct. and Lexington Dr. On arriving, Battalion 19 Jim Shepard found that the driver of the truck had emptied the contents in the middle of the street, and it was smoldering. Engine 79’s crew worked to separate the pile, and after a good bit of foraging, found the still burning hunk of firewood pictured above.

Yes, someone discarded hot firewood in the trash.

Luckily no one was injured, thanks to the heads up work by the truck driver to notice the fire early.

But really? We’ve told you many times that embers and debris from a fireplace need to be discarded carefully. Placed in a metal container and doused with water thoroughly. Not in a plastic trash can. Ever.

Had that container been up against a home and left with the hot embers, it could have started a much larger fire and possibly involved the home.

Firefighters Tommy Kirk, Grant Castor and Peter Mills work to separate the trash and find the source of the fire.
The smoldering pile of trash in the middle of Lexington Drive in Buckingham Township on March 17.

Quick response limits damage

Firefighters Justin Hane and Ray Bosche advance a line into the heavily involved room.

The fire company was dispatched for a building fire to 625 North Main St in Doylestown Borough for a fire at the Main Street Inn. En route, Bucks County Fire Radio reported that police were on scene reporting heavy fire from a 1st floor room. Battalion 19, Jim Shepard, arrived on scene and reported a working fire. Engine 19, with the sleep-in duty crew, arrived and quickly stretched a hand line and knocked down the fire. There was damage to both floors of the motel. One firefighter was treated and released for minor burns. Central Bucks Regional Police and the Bucks County Fire Marshals office are investigating the cause of the fire.

Line is pulled from Engine 19 as Battalion 79 Will Fluck sizes up the attack.
Firefighter Justin Hane prepares to attack the blaze.
Firefighters Tommy Kirk and Justin Hane get water on the fire.

Midway calls for mutual aid for Peddlers Village building fire

On Tuesday December 20, 2016, Rescue 19 and Engine 19-1 were dispatched on Box 5-52, The Nut Kettle at Peddlers Village on Rt 202 in Lahaska. On arrival, Assistant Chief 5, Tom Benscoter, arrived on location and reported heavy fire showing. Rescue 19 was dispatched as the RIT team, and Engine 19-1 to the scene for manpower.  Members assisted with overhaul and ventilation. There were no injuries.

Midway firefighters make entry to the building.

Tommy Kirk cuts the exterior wall to check for extension.
Lori Westover uses a chainsaw to ventilate the exterior wall and check for extension.
Battalion 19, Jim Shepard, opens windows for ventilation.

Preparing for the Snowpocalypseageddon of 2016- round one

Seconds Count

By now everyone knows winter is coming. Or here. And winter storm Jonas (not the singing brothers) is near, bringing blizzard watches and packed supermarkets.

We want everyone to be safe, first and foremost. Make sure you have supplies, flashlights, blankets and batteries ready. If you use a generator when the power is out, PLEASE make sure it runs away from the home, and is not inside the structure. Make sure fireplace flues are clear and clean. Listen to official emergency information, and heed the warnings. If the storm does materialize as predicted, please stay inside and only drive if absolutely necessary.

hydranthelpersIf you’re the hearty type, in good shape and out shoveling, we ask one favor- take care of your local hydrants. The more visible and accessible, the faster we can get to the water in an emergency. If we can’t see it, or if we have to shovel around it to access it, that’s precious seconds lost allowing a fire to grow.

Help a hydrant, help your neighborhood!hydranthelpersflyer